The Weeks & Sundays After Pentecost, Yr A, 2020: Psalm Passage – Leaving behind draining fear, and running towards the Presence & Shalom of the Divine

Let me hear what God the LORD will speak, for he will speak peace to his people, to his faithful, to those who turn to him in their hearts.” (Psalm 85:8)

I started this week’s reflections on scripture based on the idea the Elijah was running away from a situation that he did not consciously plan on but felt lead to complete, due to his being “very zealous for the Lord, the God of hosts.” Later in the week I considered that maybe Elijah was not running in fear but retreating to rejuvenate himself and prepare for what was to come. Just as Jesus often retreated to communion with the Lord God who sent him. Now I consider that “fear” of the Lord, which is not fear that paralyzes but fear that draws forth awe and worship (like the disciples worshiping Jesus who walked on water and calmed the sea). But still, we journey in this life – towards that which will support and under gird us.

“Surely his salvation is at hand for those who fear him, that his glory may dwell in our land.” (Verse 9)

This running from & running towards bespeaks a good deal of action and energy. But where is rest and shalom? (Answer coming.)

“Steadfast love and faithfulness will meet; righteousness and peace will kiss each other. Faithfulness will spring up from the ground, and righteousness will look down from the sky. The LORD will give what is good, and our land will yield its increase.” (Verses 10 – 13)

We abide, beloved reader, in our world but we walk and act according to the kingdom that we are assured will come. In the Kingdom of God faithfulness springs up under us and righteousness looks down upon us – like look cool verdant grass and cool cloudless sky. But here, in our present reality, it may seem there is little relief from stress & turmoil, aggression & hatred, violence & war. We would run away in far if there was not hope or relief in our reality; maybe that is what Elijah felt. The disciples in that “little boat” probably felt pressed upon and endangered. But Jesus came out to meet them, right where they were. And the Presence of the Lord came to Elijah in a quiet and gentle way, as opposed to the turmoil he had just been through. Paul told us that the righteous that calms and soothes comes from our faith in Jesus Christ and the Divine. Which is good because our present reality does little to calm and soothe.

The psalmist says of the Divine, “Righteousness will go before him, and will make a path for his steps.” (Verse 13). There is also a path for us, beloved reader. This path of righteousness is also for us; not that righteousness will automatically stretch out in front of us. But that of all the possible paths that are before us, we should seek and chose the righteous path.

It is good to know what to run from, beloved reader. And it is also good to know what to run to. May you chose wisely, and may the Presence of the Holy Spirit guide your way. Shalom & Selah!

The Weeks & Sundays After Pentecost, Yr A, 2020: Psalm Passage – Wrestling and grasping with living in our current circumstances: listening in to Preacher and Seeker

Seeker: “Hear a just cause, O LORD; attend to my cry; give ear to my prayer from lips free of deceit.”
Preacher:
What brings you to prayer now Seeker? If there is a burden on your soul, please know that I am hear and ready to listen. Seeker: Sometimes Preacher I feel so overwhelmed by what is happening in the world. I know the Lord is with us, and we have not been abandoned by the Divine. But it is such a struggle to grapple with the world. My spirit wanes, and my hope seems to be blown away by the adversity I see. In all of this Preacher, I have to hope that my weakness does not lead to sin.
Preacher: “From you let my vindication come; let your eyes see the right.”
Our current reality presses in on us all. And be assured, Seeker, the Lord will uphold you.
Seeker:
Then I say with the psalmist, “If you try my heart, if you visit me by night, if you test me, you will find no wickedness in me; my mouth does not transgress.”
Preacher:
Do not think, dear beloved Seeker, that I am immune to the discord and angst I see and feel in the world. But like the psalmist says, “As for what others do, by the word of your lips I have avoided the ways of the violent.” I know you Seeker, you have not and will not fall into harsh and violent ways.
Seeker: “My steps have held fast to your paths; my feet have not slipped.”
You have shown yourself to be a good model for me, Preacher. You have done as the psalmist says, “I call upon you, for you will answer me, O God; incline your ear to me, hear my words.”
Preacher:
Seeker, if I have done well, it is because the Divine has held me up. “Wondrously show your steadfast love, O Savior of those who seek refuge from their adversaries at your right hand.” While you may think your faith and strong spirits are sinking under the weight of all things, the Lord God’s strength will be a firm foundation. The is solid Divine support beneath you.
Seeker:
The psalmist declares for all of us, “As for me, I shall behold your face in righteousness; when I awake I shall be satisfied, beholding your likeness.” ( Psalm 17:1-7, 15)

The Weeks & Sundays After Pentecost, Yr A, 2020: Psalm Passage – Praising the power of the Kingdom of Heaven & the Divine; how it moves us forward

Your decrees are wonderful; therefore my soul keeps them.” ( Psalm 119:129)

I really hoped the Psalm passage today would be a lament. I feel like lamenting – with everything going on in the outer world and the concerns I have for my inner world, there needs to be some lamenting. But it is true that if the Lord God the Divine is watching over the world, there is cause and reason to praise. And it is good for us to praise, even while we feel the need to lament. In fact, praising in the face of the need to lament is an act of faith & courage, and a tenet of faithful spiritual life.

“The unfolding of your words gives light; it imparts understanding to the simple.” (Verse 130)

You know beloved reader, that is true also. Whether it be words or praise or lament, stories from the Old Testament, stories from the Gospel, or letters from the apostles – all of these give light and learning to our lives.

“With open mouth I pant, because I long for your commandments. Turn to me and be gracious to me, as is your custom toward those who love your name. Keep my steps steady according to your promise, and never let iniquity have dominion over me. Redeem me from human oppression, that I may keep your precepts. Make your face shine upon your servant, and teach me your statutes.” (Verses 131 – 135)

We even more than the psalmist have reason to praise the Lord God the Divine. We have not only the stories of the called and chosen people in the Old Testament, but the direct testimony of the gospel writers and the letters from the apostle to light our way and lead us forward. Hmm, that sounds like something Preacher or Seeker would say. Curious.

“My eyes shed streams of tears because your law is not kept.” (Verse 136)

Here is my chance to lament. Here is reason to lament. For the psalmist it was probably the Ten Commandments and the tenets of faith that the called and chosen people were given to follow and keep. Whether or not those tenets of faith can be understood by us in our modern times, it was important to the people then; and the neglecting of them then caused great despair, as does the neglecting and negating of the tenet of modern Christianity causes us despair now.

But, beloved reader, it is our lamenting of the Divine’s neglected decrees that also brings light and understanding. We see why these decrees are important, and that our lives would be better and more joy filled if they were followed. Our lament becomes an act of worship – or did I say that already? May be not. If I did, it should be stated again!

May you, beloved reader, praise the Divine while you see clearly where humanity has fallen short and away from that the Lord God intended. And may the Divine comfort you! Shalom & Selah!

The Weeks & Sundays After Pentecost, Yr A, 2020: Psalm Passage – The Divine seeing clearly what there is in us to “harvest”

Preacher: “O LORD, you have searched me and known me”.

Seeker: “You know when I sit down and when I rise up; you discern my thoughts from far away.”

Preacher: “You search out my path and my lying down, and are acquainted with all my ways.”

Seeker: “Even before a word is on my tongue, O LORD, you know it completely.”

Preacher: “You hem me in, behind and before, and lay your hand upon me.”

Seeker: I am trying to determine, Preacher, whether these verses by the psalmist are a comfort to me. It seems, well, intrusive and . . . . . uncomfortable. Is it possible to be “too” well known?

Preacher: Well, Seeker, I can see how one might feel that way. When we look at ourselves, really look closely at ourselves and scrutinize our inner being, we may not like what we see. Some might preen and overlook the flaws in themselves, and I feel sorry for them. They are not fooling anyone on earth, and certainly not fooling the Divine. And I can see where a person might feel uncomfortable. But you have to understand, Seeker, the Divine looks on us with love and Christ’s mercy and redemption wipes away all the flaws. And really, the psalmist realized this. Read on.

Seeker: “Such knowledge is too wonderful for me; it is so high that I cannot attain it. Where can I go from your spirit? Or where can I flee from your presence? If I ascend to heaven, you are there; if I make my bed in Sheol, you are there. If I take the wings of the morning and settle at the farthest limits of the sea, even there your hand shall lead me, and your right hand shall hold me fast. If I say, “Surely the darkness shall cover me, and the light around me become night,” even the darkness is not dark to you; the night is as bright as the day, for darkness is as light to you.” Oh my! There is no escape!

Preacher: No, there is not. The Lord God’s omnipotence and omnipresence know no bounds. It is hard to know whether the psalmist meant it as a praise or a confession. I guess it depends on how the person who is speaking is feeling about himself. King David, who might have the writer of this psalm, saw himself pretty clearly – most of the time. He said, “Search me, O God, and know my heart; test me and know my thoughts. See if there is any wicked way in me, and lead me in the way everlasting.” (Psalm 139:1-12, 23-24) That last part, “lead me in the way everlasting” can be read as a petition for the Lord God to improve the way one lives out a Christian life; or as the psalmist might have seen it, to attend to his (and her) faith and spiritual life.

Seeker: It is a very brave prayer! To lay one’s self open to the Divine, and expect mercy. But I guess that is what Christ came for. To ease and support self-examination and confession to the Divine, and to assure humanity that mercy and forgiveness is available.

Preacher: That is a fine summing up for Jesus Christ’ mission, Seeker. Very fine indeed. Shalom & Selah, Seeker!

The Weeks & Sundays After Pentecost, Yr A, 2020: Psalm Passage – The Divine seeing clearly what there is in us to “harvest”

Preacher: “O LORD, you have searched me and known me”.

Seeker: “You know when I sit down and when I rise up; you discern my thoughts from far away.”

Preacher: “You search out my path and my lying down, and are acquainted with all my ways.”

Seeker: “Even before a word is on my tongue, O LORD, you know it completely.”

Preacher: “You hem me in, behind and before, and lay your hand upon me.”

Seeker: I am trying to determine, Preacher, whether these verses by the psalmist are a comfort to me. It seems, well, intrusive and . . . . . uncomfortable. Is it possible to be “too” well known?

Preacher: Well, Seeker, I can see how one might feel that way. When we look at ourselves, really look closely at ourselves and scrutinize our inner being, we may not like what we see. Some might preen and overlook the flaws in themselves, and I feel sorry for them. They are not fooling anyone on earth, and certainly not fooling the Divine. And I can see where a person might feel uncomfortable. But you have to understand, Seeker, the Divine looks on us with love and Christ’s mercy and redemption wipes away all the flaws. And really, the psalmist realized this. Read on.

Seeker: “Such knowledge is too wonderful for me; it is so high that I cannot attain it. Where can I go from your spirit? Or where can I flee from your presence? If I ascend to heaven, you are there; if I make my bed in Sheol, you are there. If I take the wings of the morning and settle at the farthest limits of the sea, even there your hand shall lead me, and your right hand shall hold me fast. If I say, “Surely the darkness shall cover me, and the light around me become night,” even the darkness is not dark to you; the night is as bright as the day, for darkness is as light to you.” Oh my! There is no escape!

Preacher: No, there is not. The Lord God’s omnipotence and omnipresence know no bounds. It is hard to know whether the psalmist meant it as a praise or a confession. I guess it depends on how the person who is speaking is feeling about himself. King David, who might have the writer of this psalm, saw himself pretty clearly – most of the time. He said, “Search me, O God, and know my heart; test me and know my thoughts. See if there is any wicked way in me, and lead me in the way everlasting.” (Psalm 139:1-12, 23-24) That last part, “lead me in the way everlasting” can be read as a petition for the Lord God to improve the way one lives out a Christian life; or as the psalmist might have seen it, to attend to his (and her) faith and spiritual life.

Seeker: It is a very brave prayer! To lay one’s self open to the Divine, and expect mercy. But I guess that is what Christ came for. To ease and support self-examination and confession to the Divine, and to assure humanity that mercy and forgiveness is available. Preacher: That is a fine summing up for Jesus Christ’ mission, Seeker. Very fine indeed. Shalom & Selah, Seeker!

The Weeks & Sundays After Pentecost, Yr A, 2020: Psalm Passage – Placing our lives back under the Divine

Your word is a lamp to my feet and a light to my path.” (Psalm 119:105)

After last week’s obstacle course of posting pictures, I decided to just go with commenting ponderings and text. Did not want to even format a “Preacher & Seeker.” Besides, I was reminded that the psalm passage is an accompaniment to the Old Testament passage, and this passage from psalm seems to me bring back to mind Esau’s giving up of his birthright. Later in the story of Jacob and Esau the lack of a birthright comes to haunt Esau and pursue Jacob. I wanted to explore that connection.

Consider, if you will, our faith as a birthright as being children of the Divine. Have we exchanged that birthright for things that do not last? What might that birthright give us further down life’s path?

“I have sworn an oath and confirmed it, to observe your righteous ordinances.” (Verse 106)

Not only did Esau lose out on his birthright, but he also lost out on the blessing from his dying father. To his credit, Esau did care about that. But his brother undercut him and got to his father first. Praise be to the Lord God that for us, as children of the Divine, there are always blessing coming from the Lord God.

“I am severely afflicted; give me life, O LORD, according to your word. Accept my offerings of praise, O LORD, and teach me your ordinances.” (Verses 107 – 108)

The Old Testament passage says that Isaac favored Esau and his outdoor ways. Their mother, Rebekah, had a soft spot for Jacob who stayed closer to the tent. Such are the ways of human emotions and sentiments. We attach ourselves to that which appeals to us, and set aside that which does not easily and immediately resonant in our beings. But the Divine is all things to all people – whoever that person may be. I think that may be why the Divine is so multi-faceted – to be in communion with all of humanity and creation. But our part is to stay close to the Divine, and conforming out life to that of the example Jesus Christ set down. Not inside oriented or outside orient, but upwardly and inwardly orient to the Holy Presence.

“I hold my life in my hand continually, but I do not forget your law.” (Verse 109)

How might one live a balanced life? Holding on to the traits that make each one of us unique, yet following the Lord God that has always been and always will be the same?

“The wicked have laid a snare for me, but I do not stray from your precepts.” (Verse 110)

It could be said that Jacob was wicked for entrapping Esau by his own hunger and exchanging momentary food for a birthright. But Esau as might have been wicked for not valuing that which was bestowed on him. They both valued, in their own way, that which their father could give them. Perhaps there was a defect in both of them that caused this family turmoil. We would not succumb to such low and unworthy impulses . . . . would we, beloved reader?

Your decrees are my heritage forever; they are the joy of my heart. I incline my heart to perform your statutes forever, to the end.” (Verses 111 – 112)

It is interesting that Jacob ended up being the wanderer while Esau stayed with his parents and made a life where they lived. Jacob did return however. And Esau made the first move to heal the rift between the two brothers. Eventually they did remember and live out the deeper heritage of faith that came down through their forebearers. I pray that we, beloved reader, would come to that realization early in our lives so that our older years may be spent dealing within the favor of the Divine. Shalom & Selah!

The Weeks & Sundays After Pentecost, Yr A, 2020: Psalms Passage – Being Humble & Simply Praising . . . Through Pictures

The LORD is gracious and merciful, slow to anger and abounding in steadfast love.”

[Tide Rising – waves rise above the rocks as human emotions rise and fall. By contrast the Lord God is peaceful and gentle]

[Peaceful, Gentle, Endless – the Lord God is calm, but will bestir the Divine self when there is need. ]

The LORD is good to all, and his compassion is over all that he has made.”

[It is not just humanity that receives gentle care; what the Lord God has created, we should show care to also]

All your works shall give thanks to you, O LORD, and all your faithful shall bless you.”

[Bruised but Beautiful – the Divine loves us just as we are.]

They shall speak of the glory of your kingdom, and tell of your power, to make known to all people your mighty deeds, and the glorious splendor of your kingdom.”

[Beach Overlook – Nature as well as humanity speaks of the Lord God; each in their own language]

Your kingdom is an everlasting kingdom, and your dominion endures throughout all generations. The LORD is faithful in all his words, and gracious in all his deeds.”

[Big Majestic – when we look over the landscape of our world, it is hard to fathom a Deity larger then the mountains that tower above us. But the Lord God Almighty is larger than what our eyes can see and comprehend]

The LORD upholds all who are falling, and raises up all who are bowed down.” ( Psalm 145:8-14)

[Coming to Bloom – we may be in different stages and places in our lives, but the Divine is always with us, and always undertaking for us. Shalom & Selah!]

The Weeks & Sundays After Pentecost, Yr A, 2020: Psalm Passage – Preacher and Seeker: Rejoicing Under the Auspice of the Divine

Preacher: “I will sing of your steadfast love, O LORD, forever; with my mouth I will proclaim your faithfulness to all generations.”

Seeker: That is a different “tune” than you were singing last week, Preacher.

Preacher: I think the psalmist’s mood is better too. Talking about one’s hard places and challenges can be very helpful; either talking to another person, or talking to the Lord. The psalmist’s writings may be available to us, the readers. But I like to believe that when first composed, they were missives to the Divine.

Seeker: Yes, praying when the heart is weeping is a good thing to do. So is praying when the heart is full of joy.

Preacher: “I declare that your steadfast love is established forever; your faithfulness is as firm as the heavens.”

Seeker: Actually, the Lord is as faithful to us when we are in the midst of despair as when we are filled with joy and laughter.

Preacher: “You said, “I have made a covenant with my chosen one, I have sworn to my servant David: ‘I will establish your descendants forever, and build your throne for all generations.'” Selah”

Seeker: That covenant comes down to us, in a way, doesn’t Preacher? Not that we get a throne, but beyond our lives there will be Christians who adhere to the Divine’s direction and Jesus’ model for living. The throne is now occupied by the rightful ruler of all people, the Divine who is composed of three broad aspects we name Creator Lord, Jesus Christ, and the Holy Presence.

Preacher: Things work best when we have only the Divine as a our Ruler and King. The psalmist says, “Happy are the people who know the festal shout, who walk, O LORD, in the light of your countenance; they exult in your name all day long, and extol your righteousness.”

Seeker: Life would be so much better if the law of love and compassion were followed by all of humanity. We think things are so hard in life, that we are weighed down by so much. And that weight causes us to do terrible, terrible things. I do not mean to pick on any specific individual; society and humanity as a corporate group now and throughout history have done such gruesome things. We, again meaning society, recognize it and react to it . . . . . well, in diverse ways. Some defend it. Some propagate it. Some consign it to history, and either determine never to do it again or (sadly) find reasons to do it again. And some, praise to the Lord, repent of it and work towards a time when it is never done again. If society would but invoke the Divine to help us – I think it would be easier to repent of the corporate sin and mend our ways permanently. The psalmist said, “For you are the glory of their strength; by your favor our horn is exalted.”

Preacher: “For our shield belongs to the LORD, our king to the Holy One of Israel.” (Psalm 89:1-4, 15-18) Yes Seeker, would that we would rely totally on the Divine for all things. It was something that the Israelites tried to do. With limited success. And it is, though not always appearing so, our society tries to do. And, with limited success. The best we can hope for is to increase our success rate. And we have succeed completely, then we will have heaven on earth. Let us look forward to the time. And may we be inspired by the Divine to make that dream a reality. Shalom and Selah, Seeker!

Seeker: Shalom & Selah!

The Weeks & Sundays After Pentecost, Yr A, 2020: Psalm Passage – Preacher and Seeker uphold each other in staying true to the the Christian life, even when it causes embarrassment and shame

Preacher: “It is for your sake that I have borne reproach, that shame has covered my face. I have become a stranger to my kindred, an alien to my mother’s children. It is zeal for your house that has consumed me; the insults of those who insult you have fallen on me. When I humbled my soul with fasting, they insulted me for doing so.”

Seeker: The psalmist seems to be lamenting being a believer in the Divine. I guess it was hard for him at times, trying to follow a faith & spiritual journey that others did not readily or easily understand.

Preacher: The psalmist speaks for himself, but also for those in ministry now. Even in our seemingly enlightened day and age, Christians have been misunderstood and maligned. It feels like so much abuse and oppressive behavior has been done by Christian who have not rightly aligned themselves to Christ’s example.

Seeker: Have you, Preacher, been subject to derision from non-believers?

Preacher: From non-believers and believers who has substituted their own agenda and attitudes for those of Christ’s. “When I made sackcloth my clothing, I became a byword to them. I am the subject of gossip for those who sit in the gate, and the drunkards make songs about me.”

Seeker: I did not know or realize it was so hard for you. I guess I just assumed that the integrity and sincerity of your beliefs has won over those who know and know of you. How do you manage in the hard times?

Preacher: “But as for me, my prayer is to you, O LORD. At an acceptable time, O God, in the abundance of your steadfast love, answer me. With your faithful help rescue me from sinking in the mire; let me be delivered from my enemies and from the deep waters.”

Seeker: I have to admit, not everyone I know and who knows me have understood why I have chosen this path; or why I have let it – in fact – have deliberately sought for it to change my life. “Do not let the flood sweep over me, or the deep swallow me up, or the Pit close its mouth over me.”

Preacher & Seeker: “Answer me, O LORD, for your steadfast love is good; according to your abundant mercy, turn to me.”

Preacher: Why have you not spoken about this before, Seeker?

Seeker: I guess, well, because I thought it was, well . . . . . it was to somehow test my faith. And, well, not speaking much about it would prove that my faith is strong. But if the psalmist speaks of it, and you Preacher have experienced, maybe it is less about me and my strength of faith and more about how others view Christian faith. Or more precisely, Christian faith that is modeled as closely to Christ’s example as humanly possible.

Preacher: You don’t ever have to pretend that non-believers or scoffers of you faith don’t affect you. Even Jesus Christ lamented that there were those who did not believe in him. Of course, there non-belief in the Divine had and will have larger consequences than non-belief in our faith. And you can always come to the Lord God if you feel wounded.

Seeker: “Do not hide your face from your servant, for I am in distress–make haste to answer me.” The psalmist pray and plea is a good example of petitioning the Divine.

Preacher: “Draw near to me, redeem me, set me free because of my enemies.” (Psalm 69:7-18) I wonder if the psalmist felt that his enemies would pull him down and undo all that the Lord God had done for and with the psalmist. That is a heavy fear to carry around. Make a pact with me, Seeker, that before our faith is undone we will come to each other and the Divine to shore us up and keep our faith intact and whole.

Seeker: Shalom & Selah, Preacher!

The Weeks & Sundays After Pentecost, Yr A, 2020: Psalm Passage – Praising the Divine . . . . with the best of intentions

It is fairly obvious I imagine that the “Preacher” and “Seeker” are different voices or personas that I use to convey perspectives on scripture passages, faith issues, and life in general. What you may not know is the posting platform I use does not make in easy or straightforward to use italics interspersed with plain text. So whenever I am going to use the “Preacher and Seeker” motif, I have to take a deep breath (or many) and keep my patience and temper in check. I really like using that way of presenting the psalm passages because they lend themselves to call and response, and dialogue – either with others, with one’s self, or with the Divine. I imagine the psalmist felt that way also. From the instructions that we find at the beginning of some psalms, I wonder too if the psalmist had “challenges” getting his verse presented the way he wanted them.

“Make a joyful noise to the LORD, all the earth.” (Psalm 100:1)

Making a “joyful noise” is not done just through song. It can be done through prose/writing as I do it. It can be done through the visual arts as well. I had a fellow seminary student who immersed herself in the visual arts during her seminary studies and wrote a book outlining how the visual arts can be done in worship circles. I have dabbled also in the visual arts but more often now it is through writing that I make “a joyful noise to the Lord.”

The “to the Lord” part is important, otherwise its “just” entertainment or venting or some other form of communication to whoever is listening. Lately we have been hearing a lot of venting – both audible and visual. That, beloved reader, is rarely worship to the Lord. Although protests and demonstrations can be motivated by faith. Discern carefully though the outcome of the protests and venting. The outcome is important in deciding the advisability of any plan or intent. The psalmist plead his case/cause and the cause his people to the Lord God. And the Lord God heard. The Lord God also plead the Divine case/cause to the called and chosen people – they did not always hear! But, . . . I digress and we have a few more verses to look at.

“Worship the LORD with gladness; come into his presence with singing.” (Verse 2)

Protests & demonstrations by their very nature are not often prompted by “gladness” lately. In fact as I ponder on that idea, one does not really protest when someone is glad about something. And when “protests” are combined with “demonstrations” we can assume that the “demonstration” is showing discontent. A counseling thought – in heaven the only demonstrations will be of love, compassion, and care; and there will be no cause of protest.

“Know that the LORD is God. It is he that made us, and we are his; we are his people, and the sheep of his pasture.” (Verse 3)

“We” – when the psalmist wrote this, he meant his audience and the people that comprised the Israelite nation. But, beloved reader, when we read this “We” it should be with the awareness that the Divine is the Lord God of all of humanity and creation. If that were true everywhere throughout the world, there would be no need for protests & demonstrations, and it would be “heaven on earth.”

“Enter his gates with thanksgiving, and his courts with praise. Give thanks to him, bless his name.
For the LORD is good; his steadfast love endures forever, and his faithfulness to all generations.” (Verses 4 – 5)

As called and professed Christians – actually, beloved reader, words fail me. What I see in the news leads me to believe that Christianity falls far short of what Christ intended. You see, it is not enough to say this thanksgiving and praise, this blessing and goodness, this love and faithfulness happens. We need to make sure it happens for humanity in all generations. That was the Divine’s intention, and it should be ours! Shalom & Selah!