Sixth Sunday of Easter: The Gospel Passage – Healing Mode

After this there was a festival of the Jews, and Jesus went up to Jerusalem.” (John 5:1)

A good portion of Jesus’ ministry was healing people. Jesus had healed the royal official’s son before going up to Jerusalem (that was the “after this” proceeding this passage). As someone who has all manner of illnesses, I pay special attention to the healings in the New Testament.

“Now in Jerusalem by the Sheep Gate there is a pool, called in Hebrew Beth-zatha, which has five porticoes. In these lay many invalids–blind, lame, and paralyzed. One man was there who had been ill for thirty-eight years.” (Verses 2 – 5)

If you, beloved reader, say “I cannot begin to imagine being ill for 38 years!” then you are not well acquainted with chronic illness. I must tell you, however, if it were me I would not be sitting/laying in a portico hoping to get well. I would be out living life as best I could. Even if it meant doing only a little bit every day, I would be doing as much as I could as long as I could. It could be that Jesus asked this the man the following question because there is the appearance that he had spent 38 years of his life focusing on the negative, what he cannot do.

“When Jesus saw him lying there and knew that he had been there a long time, he said to him, “Do you want to be made well?” The sick man answered him, “Sir, I have no one to put me into the pool when the water is stirred up; and while I am making my way, someone else steps down ahead of me.” (Verses 6 – 7)

What you may not realize, beloved reader, is that verse 4 is missing and it would tell you more about vignette at this pool; legend said that the waters of the pool are stirred up by an angel at intervals and the first person in the water gets miraculously healed. Now the source for this detail is unreliable enough that most translations have omitted this detail. It seems to me that if something like that was going on during the time of Jesus’ ministry – that is, an angel stirring the water – Jesus might have been more aware of it and done some stirring himself. Perhaps that is why verse 4 was omitted, and why Jesus makes no comment on the legend but instead intercedes with a more direct miracle.

“Jesus said to him, “Stand up, take your mat and walk.” At once the man was made well, and he took up his mat and began to walk. Now that day was a Sabbath.” (Verses 8 – 9)

Setting aside the tale of the angel stirring the water, I do have several questions about this passage. Was the man’s answer enough? That he wanted to be healed and was putting for the effort with all his energy and ability? Was Jesus’ heart moved because obviously the man had no friends or family to help or support him. And while there is a presumption that the man might have been by the pool for 38 years, maybe his illness only recently became chronic enough that it lead him to “reach for a miracle”.

I am reminded too of the blind man who comes later in the gospel of John (ironically) and who Jesus said was blind “so that God’s works can be revealed in him.” Now, I don’t know if that is the same situation here. But it certainly seems that Jesus was on a mission to heal those who were in need. And then I think of myself – my illnesses – and I think how I could use some healing too. As I said previously (here and other places) that I am not waiting on healing but moving forward as best I can. Not exactly taking up my mat and “walking”; but neither am I waiting for the waters to be stirred so that I can regain the health I lost. Jesus may have not healed my body, but my spirit – beloved reader – soars!

I hope and prayer beloved reader that what ever illness may be in your life, the Divine lifts you and leads you to wholeness. Selah!

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Fifth Sunday of Easter: The Gospel Passage – Beyond the Cross

When he [Judas] had gone out, Jesus said, “Now the Son of Man has been glorified, and God has been glorified in him. If God has been glorified in him, God will also glorify him in himself and will glorify him at once.” (John 13:31 – 32)

The events of Holy Week have been set in motion . . . . we have heard it again. But I have to ask, “Why are we hearing it again?” Maybe you are asking the Revised Common Lectionary that too? After so many years, five and counting, of commenting on the RCL I have become accustomed to it being the source and authority of what to write and comment on. Others use the RCL to make their way through the Christian year, plan worship services, and guide their meditations & reflections. There are other sources of scripture readings that list what to read when. The RCL is the one that comes most readily to my mind.

Of course according to the RCL we are still in Easter “mode”, so harking back to Judas, Jesus, and the Last Supper is not to much of a stretch. And if we put the emphasis on the “glorifying and being glorified” portion we can set aside the circumstances – mostly. In essence, the events that have been set in motion will glorify Jesus and the Divine. Jesus is glorified because of his association with the Divine, and the Divine is glorified because of Jesus’ willingness to be obedient unto death. And as Jesus speaks further, we can see/hear/read that his thoughts and reflections are beyond just the events of the next few days.

“Little children, I am with you only a little longer. You will look for me; and as I said to the Jews so now I say to you, ‘Where I am going, you cannot come.’ I give you a new commandment, that you love one another. Just as I have loved you, you also should love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you have love for one another.” (Verses 33 – 35)

As I was writing this I remembered the article I had come across as I was preparing to write about Holy Week and Easter – the article by my former college bible professor. The image of an angry and vengeful God that Christ’s sacrifice was supposed to appease does not seem to be in line with a God that is glorified because of Jesus Christ. But as I think that idea through, it collides with other understandings of Jesus’ death and the need for his death.

Maybe it is just as well to move on to the “new commandment” of love, loving others as Jesus and the Lord God the Divine loved us. And that through that love we are known as disciples of the Divine. Yes, I think that is the better emphasis! Selah!

Fourth Sunday of Easter: The Gospel Passage – Learning about the Lord God the Divine

At that time the festival of the Dedication took place in Jerusalem. It was winter, and Jesus was walking in the temple, in the portico of Solomon. So the Jews gathered around him and said to him, “How long will you keep us in suspense? If you are the Messiah, tell us plainly.” Jesus answered, “I have told you, and you do not believe. The works that I do in my Father’s name testify to me; but you do not believe, because you do not belong to my sheep.” (John 10:22 – 26)

What does the Messiah look like? How does the Messiah act? By what signs will we know the Messiah? These were questions that the expectant Jewish asked themselves and each other. Whatever their answers were, Jesus was not the answer they were looking for. He had the power of the physical and natural world, as they expected the Messiah would. But his appearance, background, and temperament were not what they expected of the Messiah, the powerful Envoy of the Divine. And that was exactly the point – they expected the Messiah to radiate terrifying power that would shake loose the hold that the Roman Empire had on them.

“My sheep hear my voice. I know them, and they follow me. I give them eternal life, and they will never perish. No one will snatch them out of my hand. What my Father has given me is greater than all else, and no one can snatch it out of the Father’s hand. The Father and I are one.” (Verses 27 – 30)

If (the Jews reasoned) Jesus had power, why did he not use it to swing things to the advantage of the Jews? The problem was, beloved reader, Jesus the Messiah did not come just for the Jews. He came for the benefit of all of humanity. Those who could not see what the Messiah was meant to be, as Barnes interpret Jesus’ comments, are “not my people, my followers. You do not possess the spirit of meek and humble disciples. Were it not for pride, and prejudice, and vainglory for your false notions of the Messiah, and from a determination not to believe, you would have learned from my declarations and works that I am the Christ.”

Think back to what the Hebrews/Israelites wanted from a king. What they craved from King Saul, and what they pressed for in King David. This was their idea of a Messiah. Not the meek and gentle Jesus that pursued peace and compassion, and extolled love and acceptance. What do you look for, beloved reader, in a Messiah? Are you looking in the correct place and for the correct Deity? Do not be fooled! Selah!

Third Sunday of Easter: The Gospel Passage – Re-entering the story

After these things Jesus showed himself again to the disciples by the Sea of Tiberias; and he showed himself in this way.” (John 21:1)

The writer of the gospel of John gives us a picture of Jesus “popping up” here and there, but not having a physical presence endures in space and time. Jesus, it would seem, has progressed beyond those human limitations. From perspective it is good and makes sense in that Jesus has left behind a physical human form; but he is less of a “Lord with us” and more of a Transcendent Divine. The disciples knew Jesus as friend and teacher who was with them and among them. This Jesus is different.

“Gathered there together were Simon Peter, Thomas called the Twin, Nathanael of Cana in Galilee, the sons of Zebedee, and two others of his disciples. Simon Peter said to them, “I am going fishing.” They said to him, “We will go with you.” They went out and got into the boat, but that night they caught nothing.” (Verses 2 – 3)

I get the sense, and maybe you too beloved reader, that the disciples were a little bit at a loss of what to do now, and what was expected of them. Simon Peter, being a practical sort, decides to occupy his time with something he knows – fishing.

“Just after daybreak, Jesus stood on the beach; but the disciples did not know that it was Jesus. Jesus said to them, “Children, you have no fish, have you?” They answered him, “No.” He said to them, “Cast the net to the right side of the boat, and you will find some.” So they cast it, and now they were not able to haul it in because there were so many fish. That disciple whom Jesus loved said to Peter, “It is the Lord!” When Simon Peter heard that it was the Lord, he put on some clothes, for he was naked, and jumped into the sea.” (Verses 4 – 7)

If this is reminiscent of earlier encounters with Jesus (Peter being called to be a “fisher of men” and Peter jumping out of the boat to try to walk to Jesus on the water) it is probably no coincidence.

“But the other disciples came in the boat, dragging the net full of fish, for they were not far from the land, only about a hundred yards off. When they had gone ashore, they saw a charcoal fire there, with fish on it, and bread. Jesus said to them, “Bring some of the fish that you have just caught.” So Simon Peter went aboard and hauled the net ashore, full of large fish, a hundred fifty-three of them; and though there were so many, the net was not torn.” (Verses 8 – 11)

Something has changed, beloved reader. This Jesus (yes, this may be the beginning of the many aspect of the Divine) is more pragmatic, cooking and tending a fire. And ensuring that the disciples have resources and provisions.

“Jesus said to them, “Come and have breakfast.” Now none of the disciples dared to ask him, “Who are you?” because they knew it was the Lord. Jesus came and took the bread and gave it to them, and did the same with the fish. This was now the third time that Jesus appeared to the disciples after he was raised from the dead.” (Verses 12 – 14)

If we were going to be mystical about this, it may go as follows. Just as there is the theology of a triune Divine, we have three aspects of Jesus that have been seen since his resurrection. I am not going to go as far as trying to discern which is which – it enough that there were two previous occasions, and this being the third and final(?) Might there have been a purpose for the previous two appearances? And if so, what needs to be accomplished yet in this third and final visit?

“When they had finished breakfast, Jesus said to Simon Peter, “Simon son of John, do you love me more than these?” He said to him, “Yes, Lord; you know that I love you.” Jesus said to him, “Feed my lambs.” A second time he said to him, “Simon son of John, do you love me?” He said to him, “Yes, Lord; you know that I love you.” Jesus said to him, “Tend my sheep.” He said to him the third time, “Simon son of John, do you love me?” Peter felt hurt because he said to him the third time, “Do you love me?” And he said to him, “Lord, you know everything; you know that I love you.” Jesus said to him, “Feed my sheep.” (Verses 15 – 17)

It had been suggested to me that Jesus asks this question of Peter three times in order to expunge the three times that Peter denied him. And to confirm to Peter that the Divine has a specific task for him. And if this was done in the hearing of the other disciples, perhaps it redeemed Peter in their eyes also. It is my contention, however, that Peter was not the only one to have this task placed on him. Anyone who loves the Lord God the Divine is charged with tending the Divine’s sheep. Vagueness intended!

“Very truly, I tell you, when you were younger, you used to fasten your own belt and to go wherever you wished. But when you grow old, you will stretch out your hands, and someone else will fasten a belt around you and take you where you do not wish to go.” (He said this to indicate the kind of death by which he would glorify God.) After this he said to him, “Follow me.” (Verses 18 – 21)

Jesus has come once again to his disciples, to teach them a little more; and to draw them into the ongoing story of the Divine’s mission and purpose in the world. Selah!

Second Sunday of Easter: The Gospel Passage – We need to carry the story to others within ourselves

When it was evening on that day, the first day of the week, and the doors of the house where the disciples had met were locked for fear of the Jews, Jesus came and stood among them and said, “Peace be with you.” After he said this, he showed them his hands and his side. Then the disciples rejoiced when they saw the Lord. Jesus said to them again, “Peace be with you. As the Father has sent me, so I send you.” When he had said this, he breathed on them and said to them, “Receive the Holy Spirit. If you forgive the sins of any, they are forgiven them; if you retain the sins of any, they are retained.” ( John 20:19 – 23)

My first inclination was to consider this a transfer of power, similar to when the Holy Spirit descended upon the disciples. But it is not quite that. I do not think it is the ability or authority to judge others either. The disciples are to, based on what they had learned from Jesus, determine what living an authentic Christian life should look like. Jesus retains the right to forgive, and the Lord God determines what the Christian teachings are. The disciples, now apostles, help to translate and apply it to daily living. One strong reason I feel it was not a transfer of Spiritual power is because not all of the disciples were present.

“But Thomas (who was called the Twin), one of the twelve, was not with them when Jesus came. So the other disciples told him, “We have seen the Lord.” But he said to them, “Unless I see the mark of the nails in his hands, and put my finger in the mark of the nails and my hand in his side, I will not believe.” A week later his disciples were again in the house, and Thomas was with them. Although the doors were shut, Jesus came and stood among them and said, “Peace be with you.” Then he said to Thomas, “Put your finger here and see my hands. Reach out your hand and put it in my side. Do not doubt but believe.” Thomas answered him, “My Lord and my God!” (Verses 24 – 28)

I read somewhere that Thomas’ identification was actually a double identification – I do not remember where. By call Jesus “Lord” Thomas is recognizing the teacher that he had known, acknowledging Jesus’ Divine aspect. But he also identifies Jesus as God – which I assume means the Ultimate Authoritative Deity that first called out Abraham. That is quite an astute insight by Thomas.

“Jesus said to him, “Have you believed because you have seen me? Blessed are those who have not seen and yet have come to believe.” (Verse 29)

Do you see our (meaning those believers who came after the apostles) prominence and recognition? That we believe on strength of inner faith and insight as opposed to seeing and feeling Jesus with physical sensation.

“Now Jesus did many other signs in the presence of his disciples, which are not written in this book. But these are written so that you may come to believe that Jesus is the Messiah, the Son of God, and that through believing you may have life in his name.” (Verses 30 – 31)

The writer of the gospel of John is extending to his reader the opportunity to believe in Jesus as Lord God through the written word that speaks to one’s heart and spirit. The gospel of John leans heavily on the spiritual and mystical aspect of Jesus as opposed to the tactile and visual narration that is in the other gospels – so to speak. What we (modern day humanity) have is “only” words and the inspiration that we receive from the Spirit. If that spoken or written testimony brings one to faith, then we have achieved the blessedness that Jesus speaks of. I know that some people desire the type of in-person relationship with the Divine that the disciples/apostles had. And that would be wonderful. But, at least up to the time of this writing (and your reading it), that is not our reality.

If you have been moved and inspired during this season of Lent and Easter, let that be your inspiration for the coming year. And if this Lent/Easter was not a time of insight and revelation, determine in your own self to seek out the Lord through scripture reading, meditation, and prayer – and any other authentic spiritual discipline. Selah! n

Holy Week – Easter Sunday: Gospel and Psalm Passages – Now the story is ours to continue

But on the first day of the week, at early dawn, they came to the tomb, taking the spices that they had prepared. They found the stone rolled away from the tomb, but when they went in, they did not find the body.” (Luke 24:1 – 3)

Funeral practices vary from culture to culture, generation to generation, era to era – well, you get the picture. Ordinarily the body would have been prepared before burial, but time grew short before the Sabbath and expediency ruled. Now they had time, and wanted to prepare Jesus’ body properly. But as Jesus tried to tell them, he was bringing changes.

“While they were perplexed about this, suddenly two men in dazzling clothes stood beside them. The women were terrified and bowed their faces to the ground, but the men said to them, “Why do you look for the living among the dead? He is not here, but has risen. Remember how he told you, while he was still in Galilee, that the Son of Man must be handed over to sinners, and be crucified, and on the third day rise again. Then they remembered his words, and returning from the tomb, they told all this to the eleven and to all the rest.” (Verses 4 – 9)

Other than some brief appearances and final words, really, Jesus’ time on the earth was over. All that reminded was to prepare and commission the disciples and Jesus’ followers.

“Now it was Mary Magdalene, Joanna, Mary the mother of James, and the other women with them who told this to the apostles. But these words seemed to them an idle tale, and they did not believe them. But Peter got up and ran to the tomb; stooping and looking in, he saw the linen cloths by themselves; then he went home, amazed at what had happened.” (Verses 10 – 12)

Not that it was a simple task to prepare them and raise them up as apostles and missionaries for the Word of God. The work ahead was more of that of the Spirit than the flesh and blood man that Jesus had been.

“But Mary stood weeping outside the tomb. As she wept, she bent over to look into the tomb; and she saw two angels in white, sitting where the body of Jesus had been lying, one at the head and the other at the feet. They said to her, “Woman, why are you weeping?” She said to them, “They have taken away my Lord, and I do not know where they have laid him.” When she had said this, she turned around and saw Jesus standing there, but she did not know that it was Jesus. Jesus said to her, “Woman, why are you weeping? Whom are you looking for?” Supposing him to be the gardener, she said to him, “Sir, if you have carried him away, tell me where you have laid him, and I will take him away.” Jesus said to her, “Mary!” She turned and said to him in Hebrew, “Rabbouni!” (which means Teacher). Jesus said to her, “Do not hold on to me, because I have not yet ascended to the Father. But go to my brothers and say to them, ‘I am ascending to my Father and your Father, to my God and your God.'” Mary Magdalene went and announced to the disciples, “I have seen the Lord”; and she told them that he had said these things to her.” (John 20:11-18 )

The books of the bible that follow the gospels tell of what happened after Jesus returned to the Divine. The letters that the apostles wrote and the accounts of faith and works that they record have been a guide to believers for, well, countless generations. The lessons were learn from those letters we apply to our lives in the best way we can. Not necessarily the most effective and correct ways, but the best we can. I become more and more aware of that as the years go by.

Preacher: “O give thanks to the LORD, for he is good; his steadfast love endures forever!”
Seeker: “Let Israel say, “His steadfast love endures forever.” (Psalms 118:1 – 2)

From the first books of the bible where the story of creation is given, through the calling of the first people of the Divine and their “wandering” story, to the formation of the Hebrews/Israelites/Judahites/Jews, and then to the prophets of the Lord God – there are lessons to be learned from the accounts and chronicles there. We take from them what our own intellect tells us and what the Divine inspires us to.

Preacher: “The LORD is my strength and my might; he has become my salvation.
Seeker: “There are glad songs of victory in the tents of the righteous: “The right hand of the LORD does valiantly; the right hand of the LORD is exalted; the right hand of the LORD does valiantly.”
Preacher: “I shall not die, but I shall live, and recount the deeds of the LORD.”
Seeker: “The LORD has punished me severely, but he did not give me over to death.” (Verses 14 – 18)

The New Testament turns a corner and what was guessed it is more clearly explained to the reader. But still it with the hands, pen, and understanding of humanity that it is told. The Spirit inspires, but we discern. Do we discern correctly? Oh beloved reader, I have asked that a thousand times. Have we and do we discern correctly?

Preacher: “Open to me the gates of righteousness, that I may enter through them and give thanks to the LORD.
Seeker: “This is the gate of the LORD; the righteous shall enter through it.”
Preacher: “I thank you that you have answered me and have become my salvation. The stone that the builders rejected has become the chief cornerstone.”
Seeker & Preacher: “This is the Lord’s doing; it is marvelous in our eyes. This is the day that the LORD has made; let us rejoice and be glad in it.” (Verses 19 – 24)

When I was a youngster things were clear and absolute. As I grew to adulthood I became less sure, but more determined to discern and discover. I am still discerning and discovering. Easter Sunday, however, is one of the times when things are the most clear. Jesus has risen! And reigns for ever more! What we do with that news . . . . is up to us. Selah!

Holy Week – Thursday: The Old Testament, Epistle, and Gospel Passage – Now with the story moving on, there is no going back

The LORD said to Moses and Aaron in the land of Egypt:
This month shall mark for you the beginning of months; it shall be the first month of the year for you.
Tell the whole congregation of Israel that on the tenth of this month they are to take a lamb for each family, a lamb for each household. If a household is too small for a whole lamb, it shall join its closest neighbor in obtaining one; the lamb shall be divided in proportion to the number of people who eat of it. Your lamb shall be without blemish, a year-old male; you may take it from the sheep or from the goats. You shall keep it until the fourteenth day of this month; then the whole assembled congregation of Israel shall slaughter it at twilight. They shall take some of the blood and put it on the two doorposts and the lintel of the houses in which they eat it. They shall eat the lamb that same night; they shall eat it roasted over the fire with unleavened bread and bitter herbs. Do not eat any of it raw or boiled in water, but roasted over the fire, with its head, legs, and inner organs. You shall let none of it remain until the morning; anything that remains until the morning you shall burn. This is how you shall eat it: your loins girded, your sandals on your feet, and your staff in your hand; and you shall eat it hurriedly. It is the passover of the LORD. For I will pass through the land of Egypt that night, and I will strike down every firstborn in the land of Egypt, both human beings and animals; on all the gods of Egypt I will execute judgments: I am the LORD. The blood shall be a sign for you on the houses where you live: when I see the blood, I will pass over you, and no plague shall destroy you when I strike the land of Egypt. This day shall be a day of remembrance for you. You shall celebrate it as a festival to the LORD; throughout your generations you shall observe it as a perpetual ordinance.” (Exodus 12:1-14)


This is what Jesus and his disciples were celebrating when they had their shared meal, their Last Supper together. Since they were mostly probably single men, or at least away from their families this Passover season, they came together as a combined household/neighbors. I do not know whether they painted the doorposts and lintel of the house where they were – maybe the door frame to the upper room where they had their meal. Neither do I know whether the remains of the meal were burned. The New Testament – the gospel passage – does not tell us. Jesus and his disciples were far removed from the first Passover celebrated in Egypt. Also far removed from the Passovers in the desert. Generations removed from Passovers in the land that the Lord God gave them. And past history the years where kings ruled over Israel and Judah. What remnant remained of the Passover is recounted in the Gospel passage.

Paul, intentionally or not, started a new tradition – Communion. He recounts what Jesus did at the Last Supper, and for future generations sets a pattern of re-creating and reliving the Last Supper. For some faith traditions the Last Supper is celebrated yearly. For others, when the occasion seems right and proper for such celebrations. And still other faith traditions took on the celebration of the Last Supper as something done whenever the faithful are gathered.

“For I received from the Lord what I also handed on to you, that the Lord Jesus on the night when he was betrayed took a loaf of bread, and when he had given thanks, he broke it and said, “This is my body that is for you. Do this in remembrance of me.” In the same way he took the cup also, after supper, saying, “This cup is the new covenant in my blood. Do this, as often as you drink it, in remembrance of me.” For as often as you eat this bread and drink the cup, you proclaim the Lord’s death until he comes.” (1 Corinthians 11:23-26)

For Anabaptists another practice from the Last Supper was adopted and adapted. If some celebrations of Communion have been imbued with pomp, circumstance, ritual, tradition, and exclusivity – foot washing is just the opposite.

Now before the festival of the Passover, Jesus knew that his hour had come to depart from this world and go to the Father. Having loved his own who were in the world, he loved them to the end.” (John 13:1)

Humility and servanthood were the important characteristics of foot washing. That, and the desire to replicate what Jesus Christ modeled for his disciples.

“The devil had already put it into the heart of Judas son of Simon Iscariot to betray him. And during supper Jesus, knowing that the Father had given all things into his hands, and that he had come from God and was going to God, got up from the table, took off his outer robe, and tied a towel around himself.” (Verses 2 – 4)

With Judas determined to do what he felt compelled to do, the events of the next few days were set in motion. All that was left was to prepare his disciples for those events, and bring them into closer communion to himself, Jesus.

“Then he poured water into a basin and began to wash the disciples’ feet and to wipe them with the towel that was tied around him. He came to Simon Peter, who said to him, “Lord, are you going to wash my feet?” Jesus answered, “You do not know now what I am doing, but later you will understand.” Peter said to him, “You will never wash my feet.” Jesus answered, “Unless I wash you, you have no share with me.” Simon Peter said to him, “Lord, not my feet only but also my hands and my head!” Jesus said to him, “One who has bathed does not need to wash, except for the feet, but is entirely clean. And you are clean, though not all of you.” For he knew who was to betray him; for this reason he said, “Not all of you are clean.” (Verses 5 – 11)

Jesus washed Judas’ feet. There is no other explanation possible. Jesus washed Judas’ feet and must have already forgiven Judas for what he will do in the near future. But note what Jesus said, that this foot washing is not absolution of sin. If one has lived such a life where thought and actions are pure and clean, one only needs to cleanse one’s self from the minor dirt of daily living.

“After he had washed their feet, had put on his robe, and had returned to the table, he said to them, “Do you know what I have done to you? You call me Teacher and Lord–and you are right, for that is what I am. So if I, your Lord and Teacher, have washed your feet, you also ought to wash one another’s feet.
For I have set you an example, that you also should do as I have done to you. Very truly, I tell you, servants are not greater than their master, nor are messengers greater than the one who sent them. If you know these things, you are blessed if you do them.” (Verses 12 – 17)

Anabaptists would wash each other’s feet to demonstrate that between fellow believers power and influence are not to be considered. All are equal; all equally need to have the dirt of everyday living washed away; it is as much a blessing to have someone wash your feet as it is to wash another’s feet. That is why footwashing is done in pairs; you wash each other’s feet.

I wonder, beloved reader, if Judas would have washed Jesus’ feet? Would Judas have washed the feet of the other disciples? And how much must Judas have been determined to betray his Lord if after having his Lord humbled before him – he still went out.

“When he had gone out, Jesus said, “Now the Son of Man has been glorified, and God has been glorified in him. If God has been glorified in him, God will also glorify him in himself and will glorify him at once.
Little children, I am with you only a little longer. You will look for me; and as I said to the Jews so now I say to you, ‘Where I am going, you cannot come.’
I give you a new commandment, that you love one another. Just as I have loved you, you also should love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you have love for one another.” (31b – 35)

Tomorrow is Good Friday. For some periods of my life, Good Friday meant it was not a working day. Some years I attended a worship service. Some years I spent with family. For the past decade and a half I have written about Holy Week including Good Friday. In was already into my adult years when I discovered the traditions surrounding Maundy Thursday. It is good to keep learning about the seasons of the church year, and even better to practice them. As we come to the climax of Holy Week, may you think back on the traditions that were important to your Christian journey. And what has helped to form your faith beliefs. Shalom and Selah!