First Sunday of Lent 2019: The Psalm Passage – Being sheltered during Lent

You who live in the shelter of the Most High, who abide in the shadow of the Almighty, will say to the LORD, “My refuge and my fortress; my God, in whom I trust.” (Psalm 91:1 – 2)

A few days ago I made “confession” that I was feeling stressed and overwhelmed over something. I was going to let it rest for three days before I decided what to do, and more importantly, not to stress over it. Well, the situation has not resolved – that is, it is still present. But I am not obsessing over it, and I came up with a plan to handle it. And most importantly, I commended it to the Divine, and now I am at peace. So I can say with the psalmist “My refuge and fortress is in the Lord.” As a result . . . .

“Because you have made the LORD your refuge, the Most High your dwelling place, no evil shall befall you, no scourge come near your tent. For he will command his angels concerning you to guard you in all your ways. On their hands they will bear you up, so that you will not dash your foot against a stone. You will tread on the lion and the adder, the young lion and the serpent you will trample under foot.” (Verses 9 – 13)

I also said last time we met over scripture that Jesus’ temptations were specific to Jesus. The psalmist does offer protection for those are the subject of the preaching/teaching. But I think the psalmist’s offer of protection for feet is more metaphorical than literal. At least that is my assumption. I base it first on hyperbole of scripture. And second, you can bet that the Devil will twist the words of scripture to its own purposes and devices.

“Those who love me, I will deliver; I will protect those who know my name. When they call to me, I will answer them; I will be with them in trouble, I will rescue them and honor them. With long life I will satisfy them, and show them my salvation.” (Verses 14 – 16)

Lastly, but not least, we need to think of the saints and spiritual forebearers who have gone before us and paid with their lives for their faithfulness and steadfastness to the Divine. Can we say that the Lord God “rescued them” if they were put to death? Did that live long lives if they were cut down in their young adulthood? Yes, they were answered when they called on the Lord. The Lord was with them in troubled times and honored them. And they knew salvation. But there is no guarantee in the Christian life of safety. At least not bodily safety. And that is the falsehood that the Devil tried to sell Jesus. He did not fall for it, and neither should we.

The refuge and fortress of the Divine does not promise earthly human safety. Granted, many are saved. But it is not a promise that can be used to protect us and excuse us from reckless behavior, nor the troubled times and misfortune we have in life. In fact the season of Lent can be a time of being tested. Tested in many ways; perhaps our own temptations as we talked about yesterday. Or trouble that comes our way even within the Christian life.

Beloved reader, how I wish I could sit down with you and hear about your Christian journey. And share with you mine. Exchanging stories from our faith lives helps us to better understand the challenges and temptations, and the promises that the Divine gives us. I hope and pray during this season of Lent you do find someone to share with. Read scripture with, and pray with. Often times the refuge and fortress of the Lord is made manifest through being in community with others. And we in turn offer them a refuge and fortress that comes about because of our relationship with the Divine. The season of Lent can be an arduous one, but not one that we journey on along. Praise the Lord, and Selah!

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